2017-07-12 / Sports & Outdoors

Angel Falls

An Explore Western ME adventure
By Dee Menear Irregular Staff Writer


Angel Falls, located south of Rangeley, is an impressive hanging waterfall with an impressive 90-foot drop. (Dee Menear photo) Angel Falls, located south of Rangeley, is an impressive hanging waterfall with an impressive 90-foot drop. (Dee Menear photo) TOWNSHIP D — Angel Falls is one of Maine’s largest drop hanging waterfalls, comparable with stunning Moxie Falls in Moxie Gore Township. With a magnificent 90-foot drop into a ledge canyon and tumbling brook below, Angel Falls is truly a must-see unique natural feature. Water is said to create the shape of an angel’s wing as it plunges over the drop during high water, thus giving the fall its name.

The trek is just over a half-mile from the trailhead to the waterfall but getting there can be tricky. The trail crosses Breden Stream once and then weaves its way across Mountain Brook three times before reaching falls. The rocks can be very slippery, even those that appear dry, and the current can be swift so take your time and use caution. It is best to avoid this adventure during the early spring melt or after heavy rains. Don’t let these cautions deter you from visiting —with careful and concentrated maneuvering— Angel Falls makes a great day hike!


From Route 17 in Byron, cross the Swift River and travel 3.8 miles on a well-maintained dirt logging road to the parking area for the Angel Falls trailhead. (Dee Menear photo) From Route 17 in Byron, cross the Swift River and travel 3.8 miles on a well-maintained dirt logging road to the parking area for the Angel Falls trailhead. (Dee Menear photo) The trailhead, located on the southern end of the parking area, is well-marked with red blazes. Cross Breden Stream and through a meadow. After a short walk, the trail enters the woods and immediately connects with Mountain Stream.

Navigating the root and rock covered trail requires a little bit of rock scrambling but not much effort and the rewards of exploring the waterfall and the pools below are well worth it. The stream offers pools for dipping or wading, large rocks for sunbathing or picnicking, and plenty of opportunities for photographing and investigating.

To get to the trailhead from Oquossoc, take Route 17 south to Houghton (18.4 miles). Turn right onto Houghton Road (an unmarked dirt road) and take the bridge over the Swift River. Turn right onto Bemis Road and follow this until the road forks (3.8 miles from Route 17). Follow the road on the left to the parking area and trailhead. This road is well marked, with signs pointing the way. *Please note: Bemis Road is an active logging road. Logging trucks have the right of way. The road is gated in the winter.

From the intersection of routes 2 and 17 in Mexico, take Route 17 North for 18 miles to Houghton Road on the left. Continue with the directions above.

For more information on this hike, and many others, download Explore Western ME, the free go-to mobile app for the Western Mountains and Lakes Region of Maine. The app, packed with area information, is available for Android and iOS. Be sure to follow Explore Western ME on Facebook to keep updated on the latest events, outdoor adventures, and more.

TRAILHEAD GEOCODE:

44.7902, -70.7079

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