2017-08-09 / Front Page

No drought conditions reported locally

By Dee Menear Irregular Staff Writer


A comparison of the U.S. Drought Monitor Survey from Aug 2, 2016 to the Aug 1, 2017 survey shows a marked improvement in local drought conditions. (Map courtesy of U.S. Drought Monitor) A comparison of the U.S. Drought Monitor Survey from Aug 2, 2016 to the Aug 1, 2017 survey shows a marked improvement in local drought conditions. (Map courtesy of U.S. Drought Monitor) WESTERN MAINE — The U.S. Drought Monitor issued a drought report Aug. 3 that revealed abnormally dry and moderate drought conditions emerging in the eastern and southern parts of the state. However, the report showed marked improvement over last year in Western Maine, thanks in part to above normal precipitation.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather observer Betty Wing of Eustis has reported a total of 16.74 inches of precipitation for May thru August 6. Last year Wing reported 7.09 inches of precipitation for the same duration which was reflected in the Drought Summary for this week last year. Normal precipitation for May, June and July is nearly 10.93 inches. Although much of Franklin County was considered abnormally dry, there was a section along Route 142 that was considered to be in a moderate drought.

Wing is concerned that even with the significant rainfall, the drought could still be a threat. “We have had a lot of rain, but it’s been heavy and quick. That kind of rain runs off where a gentle rain soaks in,” Wing explained.

Temperatures are beginning to take on the feeling of fall, at least in the morning, said Wing. Last week’s daytime high temperature was a balmy 85, recorded Aug. 2. The morning of Aug. 7, Wing had 44 degrees. “Fall will come whether we like it or not. Winter will, too,” she said.

The National Drought Monitor issues weekly reports which are released Thursdays.

The U.S. Drought Monitor, established in 1999, is a weekly map of drought conditions that is produced jointly by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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